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Commit 5409e1a0 authored by Tony Finch's avatar Tony Finch

talk: more markup fixes

parent 29607ebb
......@@ -190,7 +190,8 @@
We can massively reduce the size of the problem by encrypting
the secrets with a small number of master secrets.
For example, I used to encrypt secrets using the root password.
For example, before \regpg\ I used to encrypt secrets using the root
password.
This reduces the key distribution to previously solved problems:
......@@ -209,7 +210,7 @@
But we can do better with public key cryptography.
Each person keeps their own private key - there's no need to
Each person keeps their own private key -- there's no need to
distribute any master secrets. We know how to do this because we
already do it for \ssh keys.
......@@ -232,7 +233,7 @@
\notes{
The specific kinds of secrets we are dealing with are used by
servers to authenticate themselves -
servers to authenticate themselves --
\begin{itemize}
\item \ssh host private keys
......@@ -257,7 +258,7 @@
\notes{
It's often the case that each server secret is in a file by itself -
It's often the case that each server secret is in a file by itself --
that's true for \ssh and TLS and DNS keys.
\regpg\ works best when each secret is in a file by itself. You can
......@@ -614,7 +615,7 @@
You should not normally need to edit an encrypted file by hand, but
if you do, \regpg\ tries to make it safer by keeping temporary files
in a RAM disk (at least on Linux - there's no ramfs on Mac OS) and
in a RAM disk (at least on Linux -- there's no ramfs on Mac OS) and
shredding them afterwards.
\begin{itemize}
......
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